Food For Love by C. Fonseca

People create meals for those we love because it sustains the love. How much nourishment would be necessary to fill a heart that’s empty? Food For Love lets us find out.

What was the book about?
When Jessica Harris flies home to Australia to sort out her late brother’s estate, the last thing she wants to face is his altruistic investment—an eatery on the rural Bellarine Peninsula. The injured British/Indian elite cyclist just wants to settle up, move on, get rehab, and certainly not have to deal with the restaurant’s beautiful owner and artisan foodie, Lillian McAllister, or her sweet, four-year-old daughter. In order to win, Jessica’s disciplined life is dedicated to controlling her emotions, and she isn’t sure she’d survive letting her walls down now. A lesbian romance about how nourishment is so much more than the food we eat.

Featured Tropes
Sort of enemies-to-lovers, temporary-to-permanent love. 

Book Strengths
The descriptions of the setting—that being the Bellarine Peninsula are quite lovely. As a local Melbournite, I knew exactly where the author had placed certain events. A reader from other countries will probably appreciate the slightly overly detailed explanations of local customs, and localities. The story is sweet. The death of the brother is never really explained which is good because it’s all about Jess and her understanding of her family and herself. 

Book weaknesses:
The dialogue is awkward. It’s formal and feels a bit unnatural, particularly if you’re writing Australian people. The dialogue has to be much more elastic.

Character Chemistry
Yes. Lots, especially from about a third of the way in, which is when Jess suddenly realises there’s this really hot chef right in front of her. Then it’s all on. 

Heat Rating
2 flames

Wrap up
The novel deals with the concept of feeding people; be that actual food created for those we love, or feeding people with spirit and love and a sense of place. I enjoyed the metaphorical elements in the novel.

Star Rating
4 stars

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