Just One Reason by Jaime Clevenger

A story that illustrates that when it comes to falling in love, there is never only just one reason at all.

What was the book about?
What would you do for forty-one million dollars? For Elizabeth Samuels (AKA Sam), it’s not some hypothetical what-if. It’s the very real inheritance she stands to gain if she follows the stipulations in her grandfather’s will when she takes over his family practice. The only problem? The stipulations mean a life she doesn’t want. Terri Anderson knows better than to get involved with her resident. She’s had a work romance before―it didn’t end well and she doesn’t want to be part of the gossip mill all over again. But with Sam, keeping her distance is easier said than done. When Sam considers walking away from medicine, Terri knows she can’t let her make that huge mistake. But changing Sam’s mind means getting close. A little too close. With so much at stake, now is definitely not the time to fall in love. Unfortunately there are some things in life you just can’t fight.

Featured Tropes
Medical setting, age-gap, butch/femme, mild BDSM

Book strengths
This book is an easy-read, and by that I mean Jaime Clevenger’s writing style is lovely and smooth. It wasn’t that I couldn’t put the book down, I just plain ol’ didn’t want to. Just One Reason is part of the Paradise Romance series, but I read it as a stand-alone, because of course I did. It works perfectly well by itself, but I really want to go back and read the two previous books. There are rules about making sure you read all the books in a good series. I did that with Melissa Brayden once, and then didn’t sleep for two nights as I frantically caught up on the other books I’d somehow skipped. I liked the characters of Sam and Terri. They were well-developed and their reticence towards relationships, commitment, and change all stemmed logically from their past experiences. Because, for ninety percent of the novel, this is a well-written story about two women who fall in love as they work out their roles in sex play and try to develop a relationship by challenging their misconceptions and assumptions of themselves and each other.

Book weaknesses
Here’s the other ten percent. The blurb hits us right from the start with the forty-one million dollar plot point, so I went into the story thinking that the huge amount of money was going to factor heavily throughout. And…it doesn’t. Hardly at all. It acts as the lobby door person who lets us in, says good morning, and then we get to explore a whole lot of other stuff that is not related to the money at all. And then we play inside the building of awesome other stuff for a while, then we leave the story via the forty-one million dollar door person in the lobby. Because at the end of the novel, the money pops up in an epic deus ex machina of sudden legal paperwork discovery. All the other stuff in the book?—communication, past relationships, coping with change, sex roles—all that is excellent, because in reality, that’s actually what the book is about. Not at all about scoring a pile of money by studying to be a doctor. And that jarred a little.

Character chemistry
I would label this book an erotic romance, rather than a contemporary romance. There’s a lot of sex. In the beginning, it’s angry sex. Then later, it’s talking-it-out sex. After that, it’s we-really-know-what-we’re-doing-and-we’re-awesome-at-it sex. Terri and Sam have chemistry!

Heat flame
🔥 🔥 🔥 🔥 
(4.5)

Conclusion
Just One Reason is about two women who fall in love as they work out their roles in sex play and try to develop a relationship by challenging their misconceptions and assumptions of themselves and each other.

5/5

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